March 28, 2012   2,531 notes

(Source: lovelytrek, via zombiefox13)

March 22, 2012   3,375 notes

fuckyeahillustrativeart:

Paco Martinez

(via ellisgaylepc)

January 19, 2012   44 notes

(via noiiir)

January 19, 2012   1 note
spent the weekend making a qr-code based pokemon game

spent the weekend making a qr-code based pokemon game

January 19, 2012   69 notes
stillmakingsense:

Pi

stillmakingsense:

Pi

January 19, 2012   309 notes

(Source: manieldanning, via zombiefox13)

January 19, 2012   1,151 notes
inothernews:

sematalba:

the-rest-is—silence:

wilwheaton:

lachance1986:

“…I like the amusement parks, and the sun…and girls!”
hahahaha






In the eighties, one spoke about oneself in the third person via talk bubbles.
:-)

inothernews:

sematalba:

the-rest-is—silence:

wilwheaton:

lachance1986:

“…I like the amusement parks, and the sun…and girls!

hahahaha

In the eighties, one spoke about oneself in the third person via talk bubbles.

:-)

(Source: velvetpussy86)

January 19, 2012   21 notes

rhamphotheca:

NASA | Black Hole Launches Bullets of Gas

Using observations from NASA’s Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) satellite and the National Science Foundation’s (NSF) Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) radio telescope, an international team of astronomers has identified the moment when a black hole in our galaxy launched superfast knots of gas into space.

Racing outward at about one-quarter the speed of light, these “bullets” of ionized gas are thought to arise from a region located just outside the black hole’s event horizon, the point beyond which nothing can escape.

The research centered on the mid-2009 outburst of a binary system known as H1743-322, located about 28,000 light-years away toward the constellation Scorpius. Discovered by NASA’s HEAO-1 satellite in 1977, the system is composed of a normal star and a black hole of modest but unknown masses… 

(read more: NASA Explorer - Youtube)

(via earthandscience)

January 19, 2012   3,775 notes
the-star-stuff:

Scientists prepare to capture the first-ever picture of a black hole


Tomorrow, astronomers and physicists from around the word will convene in Tucson, Arizona to discuss the Event Horizon Telescope Project — a global network of 50 radio telescopes that together could soon enable us to photograph the black hole at the center of our galaxy.
“What is great about the [black hole] in the center of the Milky Way is that [it is] big enough and close enough,” explains astronomer Dan Marrone, who co-organized the international meeting with astrophysicist Dimitrios Psaltis. “There are bigger ones in other galaxies, and there are closer ones, but they’re smaller. Ours is just the right combination of size and distance.”

Having said that, it’s still going to take just about everything we’ve got to get our black hole in-frame.
“To see something that small and that far away, you need a very big telescope, and the biggest telescope you can make on Earth is to turn the whole planet into a telescope,” Marrone said.

[Via NY Daily News + UA News]Top image is a simulation of swirling plasma, entering the black hole at the center of our galaxy — by Scott Noble/RIT

the-star-stuff:

Scientists prepare to capture the first-ever picture of a black hole

Tomorrow, astronomers and physicists from around the word will convene in Tucson, Arizona to discuss the Event Horizon Telescope Project — a global network of 50 radio telescopes that together could soon enable us to photograph the black hole at the center of our galaxy.

“What is great about the [black hole] in the center of the Milky Way is that [it is] big enough and close enough,” explains astronomer Dan Marrone, who co-organized the international meeting with astrophysicist Dimitrios Psaltis. “There are bigger ones in other galaxies, and there are closer ones, but they’re smaller. Ours is just the right combination of size and distance.”

Having said that, it’s still going to take just about everything we’ve got to get our black hole in-frame.

“To see something that small and that far away, you need a very big telescope, and the biggest telescope you can make on Earth is to turn the whole planet into a telescope,” Marrone said.

[Via NY Daily News + UA News]
Top image is a simulation of swirling plasma, entering the black hole at the center of our galaxy — by Scott Noble/RIT

(via earthandscience)

November 9, 2011   1,008 notes
inothernews:

edgina:

Alex varanese: ALT/1977 - We are not time travelers

WOOD.
GRAIN.
CASING.
And considering that’s a late 70’s design, not bad at all.

inothernews:

edgina:

Alex varanese: ALT/1977 - We are not time travelers

WOOD.

GRAIN.

CASING.

And considering that’s a late 70’s design, not bad at all.